Dog Bites and You: 5 Common Problems After a Personal Injury

Each year, people across the country suffer from personal injuries that are not their fault. These injuries range from automobile accidents to slips-and-falls to dog bites. Unfortunately, dog bites carry their own complications. In addition to dealing with the legal side of a personal injury, you might also have to deal with the physical and emotional side of a personal injury if you are bitten by a dog. Moving forward after a personal injury is not always easy, but understanding what you might experience can help.

1. Infection

When a dog bite breaks the skin, you will be at higher risk for developing an infection. This can include rabies and tetanus, as well as minor infections. It's vital that you seek medical care immediately following the dog bite incident, as this will help reduce your chances of developing an infection. Additionally, it's important to follow your doctor's recommendations when it comes to caring for the wound. You may need to receive specific vaccinations in order to prevent infections. You may also need stitches or wound care for some time. Another benefit of seeking immediate medical help is that this gives you a legal record you can use to prove when the dog bite occurred.

2. Scarring

Unfortunately, severe bites can cause scarring at the place where you were bitten. Seeking prompt medical care can help reduce scarring; however, scars are not always completely avoidable. Make sure you care properly for the wound while it is healing. If you notice any problems with the healing process, talk with your physician right away. They may also be able to prescribe medications or creams that can help reduce scar visibility.

3. Broken bones

In some extreme cases, you may experience a broken bone after a dog bite injury. If a dog jumped on you and you fell, for example, you may have injured your wrist, ankle, or even collarbone. Unfortunately, broken bones can take a long time to heal. Never skip going to the doctor if you suspect the dog attack may have fractured one of your bones. Instead, meet with your medical care professional as soon as possible. They can perform x-rays that will determine whether any bones were broken or fractured in the attack.

4. Anxiety

When you go through a difficult experience, you may suffer from anxiety after the attack. Seeking professional therapy or counseling can help you deal with the signs and symptoms of anxiety that often accompany a personal injury. It's normal to feel anxious after you are bitten by a dog; however, make sure you focus on moving forward and seeking the help you need.

5. Fear

Even if you loved dogs before the injury, you might feel scared of dogs after you're bitten by one. This is normal. It's important to understand that fear is your body's natural response to facing a serious injury and a dangerous experience. You may feel frightened when you are near animals for a long time; however, as you heal and move forward with your life, you may find that you naturally become more receptive to being around animals again.

When you're ready to move forward after a dog bite, reach out to an attorney who can help you. Call today.