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Differences of TBI’s between women and men in Virginia

On Behalf of | Nov 15, 2021 | Brain Injuries

A jolt or strike to your head could lead to far-reaching effects that can affect both you and your loved ones living in Virginia. A lot of research has been done on the impact of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) on men; however, many women in the state don’t know how such injuries specifically affect them. Therefore, let us look at how TBIs differ between men and women.

Traumatic brain injury in men and women

TBI is one of the leading causes of disability and motility in both men and women. Traditionally, it was associated with men, and a lot of research present today is based on men. However, since many women are now engaging in contact sports and joining the army, scientists have realized that the prognosis of TBI in women could be slightly different from men.

What are the common differences?

Many men, especially in their younger years, suffer more from traumatic brain injuries than females. However, women tend to have worse clinical outcomes compared to men (they had a higher mortality rate).

Once treated, women can be seen to have fewer complications than men, and they tend to perform better. Most men suffer from erectile dysfunction and inability to climax during sex, as well as, many cognitive and emotional problems.

What can you do in the event of TBI?

When you or your loved one suffers from TBI, you should file with the court to get compensation for your pain and suffering. Your recompense can also include your inability to earn as you did before and the lost income while receiving treatment.

According to Virginia law, you should file claims for compensation within two years after experiencing a traumatic brain injury from a responsible party. If your infant experiences a brain injury, you have up to five years to file for the compensation claim. The court recognizes that it can take longer for kids to show signs of brain injuries while still very young.

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